Are birds or rabbits a problem when creating a wild flower area from seed

Jul
16

Are birds or rabbits a problem when creating a wild flower area from seed

Don’t worry about birds eating your wild flower seeds, I have never found them to be a problem as the seeds are too small and they get lost amongst the soil, some grass seeds may be taken but this will not affect your final wild flower lawn or meadow appearance. However if you will have wild rabbits entering the seeded area then do protect it from them i.e. fence them out using rabbit netting, as they love young seedlings and will eat them before you even notice your seeds have germinated and you will end up with very few wild flower species or large bare areas. You can see their effects in the photograph below, they eat the young succulent seedlings just after they have germinated so you end up with big areas of nothing. Once the wild flower area is established you can remove the rabbit fence if you wish as they will not kill the fully grown plants, they will just keep some areas grazed short and reduce the amount of flowering you see.

Tell-tale signs of rabbits badly effecting the establishment of a newly created wild flower site

I found the following company’s unique plant pest deterrent products of particular interest due to their safe ingredients, beneficial side-effects on the plants and non-harmful effects on the target pest. The products are plant protectors and not pesticides. I have used their G2 formula on my plant plugs and mature plants and found them effective against slugs and snails; repeat treatment I found beneficial as the plant grows and produces new leaves and also after periods of rain.

They also do a G1 formula to protect plants against rabbits which has been used in agricultural situations as well as gardens, I am yet to try this one as I prefer to use rabbit netting to fence out my wild flower areas if rabbits are present, but I would be interested to hear from customers who have used their G1 product.
Click here to visit their website.